Strangers in a Strange World

You’re excited. You’ve spent the whole week working on this costume for this party. It’s going to be so sik. You ring the door bell, imagining the faces of your friends when they see you in the gear. The door opens and you’re greeted with shock, which turns embarrassingly into a snort and a snigger. It wasn’t a costume party, and you’re the only one dressed up. Sticking out like a sore thumb. Being a Christian can feel like being the odd one out in your friendship circles.

You might be wearing similar clothes, but instead of church your friends want to sleep in or catch a movie.

Instead of youth group, your friends want to hang out or go to a party or club. 

And it’s also deeper as well, you might realise that you value different things, you think in different ways, and act slightly differently.

And we might start to think – hey wait a minute, which way is better?

And are the accusations thrown at Christians real?

How is Christianity good for men and women?

How is Christianity good for LGBTQ people?

How is Christianity good for people who are different or marginalised?

Does Christianity have room for everyone…

Or does Christianity crush diversity?

This year ONWARD Youth is going to tackle this question head on, show that Christianity is good for everyone despite their experience, and equip you to show others the beautiful news of Jesus.

We’ve got:

  • Dave Jensen speaking on how Jesus welcomes and loves different people and brings them into his family.
  • International apologist Dr Amy Orr-Ewing will be sharing about how Christians have raised up women in the last 2000 years.
  • Joining them are a range of highly thoughtful Christians from all walks of life who will equip you to think deeply, engage you to love compassionately, and empower you to live for Jesus.

Hope to see you there.

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Onward Youth Conference helps kids (and parents) navigate tough questions.

I’m hitting the parenting danger zone. My eldest son is nearly 12. He’s started youth group and goes to a Christian school. But he’s meeting more people, accessing more information online and watching the news. He is moving outside of our ‘safe bubble’ and being hit square in the face with issues that he needs to understand and form an opinion about.

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Strangers in a Strange World

You’re excited. You’ve spent the whole week working on this costume for this party. It’s going to be so sik. You ring the door bell, imagining the faces of your friends when they see you in the gear. The door opens and you’re greeted with shock, which turns embarrassingly into a snort and a snigger.

It wasn’t a costume party, and you’re the only one dressed up.

Sticking out like a sore thumb.

Being a Christian can feel like being the odd one out in your friendship circles.